Brain Activity and Good Diet May Prevent Insomnia-Related Depression

Brain Activity and Good Diet May Prevent Insomnia-Related Depression

While lack of sleep is a major risk factor for depression, not everyone who tosses and turns at night becomes depressed. According to a study, individuals whose brains are more attuned to rewards may be protected from the negative mental health effects of poor sleep. The findings revealed that students with poor quality sleep were less likely to have symptoms of depression if they also had higher activity in a reward-sensitive region of the brain. “This helps us begin to understand why some people are more likely to experience depression when they have problems…

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Your Activity Tracker Can Now Help You Sleep Better

Your Activity Tracker Can Now Help You Sleep Better

We all know that sleep is important. Getting too little, or simply poor quality Z’s, can up your risk of serious chronic health issues like heart disease and obesity—not to mention it can screw with your gym goals. (That, on top of these 6 shocking side effects of sleep deprivation, is more than enough encouragement to get into bed.) Yet, it seems like every night when your ideal snooze time rolls around, there’s always something more important to do. Luckily, you aren’t doomed to be stuck in this poor sleep cycle forever. FitBit…

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Exercise May Boost Memory, Brain Activity in Elderly

Exercise May Boost Memory, Brain Activity in Elderly

To increase brain function and boost memory in older adults, it is important to maintain high levels of fitness through physical activity such as walking, jogging, swimming, or dancing. Brain function and memory are the hallmark impairments in Alzheimer’s disease. According to this study, the age-related changes in memory performance and brain activity largely depend on an individual’s fitness level. Older adults who exercised showed good cardiac fitness levels which improved their memory performance and increased brain activity patterns compared to their low fit peers. “Therefore, starting an exercise programme,…

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Brain Activity May Predict Risk of Falls in Elderly

Brain Activity May Predict Risk of Falls in Elderly

Measuring the level of brain activity in healthy older adults while they are walking can predict their risk of falling, suggests a study led by an Indian-origin scientist. Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older adults and all too often lead to physical decline and loss of independence. “Previous studies have shown that when older people perform cognitively demanding tasks, their brains are required to become more active to handle the challenge,” said lead author Joe Verghese, Director at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in…

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Low Levels of Physical Activity Worsens Psychosis

Low Levels of Physical Activity Worsens Psychosis

Living a sedentary lifestyle could increase your risk of developing psychosis leading to early death, a study has warned. Physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of avoidable death and is as harmful as smoking, according to World Health Organisation (WHO). The researchers found that people with psychosis — a mental disorder characterised by a disconnection from reality — die up to 15 years before the general population, largely due to heart diseases. Adults aged 18-64 must indulge in at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity throughout the week,…

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