Age is just a number. Elderly people can exercise and socialise to stay fit and prevent weakness

Age is just a number. Elderly people can exercise and socialise to stay fit and prevent weakness

Age-related frailty may be a treatable and preventable health problem, just like obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, according to a recent study. “Societies are not aware of frailty as an avoidable health problem and most people usually resign themselves to this condition,” said Jerzy Sacha from the University Hospital in Opole, Poland. “Fortunately, by opting for a proper lifestyle and adequate physical, mental, and social activities, one may prevent or delay the frailty state.” The research team reviewed over one hundred publications on recognising, treating, and preventing frailty, with the aim of…

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Beware! Excessive Boozing May Make You Age Fast, Warn Experts

Beware! Excessive Boozing May Make You Age Fast, Warn Experts

Lots have been said and researched about the harmful effects of excessive alcohol consumption by experts from across the globe. Regular alcohol consumption poses a severe threat to our health and may also make one susceptible to depression. A recently published study links excessive boozing with accelerated ageing. Experts from the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine have found a link between heavy drinking and ageing. It was found that patients who consumed excessive alcohol in their adult life showed reduction in the length of their Telomeres – a marker…

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Excess Weight at Age 20 Triples the Risk of Stomach Cancer

Excess Weight at Age 20 Triples the Risk of Stomach Cancer

Physical fitness and health awareness are growing rapidly everywhere in the world. People are relatively more conscious about their body and health. According to World Health Organization, still most of the world’s population lives in countries where overweight and obesity kill more people than underweight. 39 percent of population, aged 18 or more were over weight as per a survey by WHO in 2014. Obesity is the root cause of most of the diseases due to its adverse effects on our respiratory system, metabolism, circulatory system, etc. Keeping a regular…

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Delaying Pregnancy Till Age 35 May Make Your Kids Smarter

Delaying Pregnancy Till Age 35 May Make Your Kids Smarter

Living the life of a working woman is not easy. While you are trying to build your career to make a name in the competitive world, your family members seem to be more concerned about when you will marry, settle down and have kids. This is a common debate in various households across the country. You just don’t get to hear the end of the drawbacks of late marriage and late motherhood, and that biological clock which keeps ticking. Life decisions such as marriage and motherhood can’t be made under…

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Early Periods at the Age of 13 or Younger May Put Girls at Risk of Stroke

Early Periods at the Age of 13 or Younger May Put Girls at Risk of Stroke

The onset of menstruation signals that a girl has hit her puberty. Of course, it is not an easy cycle – the whole process of menstruation, but every woman must go through it. While it makes a woman capable of giving birth to a child, on the other hand, it also brings along with it various hormonal changes which causes mood swings, abdominal pain, back ache, muscle pull, so on and so forth. There are various home remedies women can turn to for some relief, as well as resort to…

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60% women unaware about age to begin heart screenings: Study

60% women unaware about age to begin heart screenings: Study

Sixty per cent of women in US think of heart screenings as necessary only after age 40, whereas health experts recommend that screenings should begin in the 20s, a study has found. According to the American Heart Associationrecommendations, screenings should start at 20, as the age may cause the onset of various heart-related disease. “Women cannot wait until they’re 40 to start paying attention to their risk factors. They can begin developing atherosclerosis, plaque in their arteries, in their teenage and early twenties,” Carolina Demori, cardiologist at the Orlando Health…

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Sitting for long can age women faster

Sitting for long can age women faster

Elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary, a new study has found. Researchers from University of California (UC) found that women who have a sedentary lifestyle have cells that are biologically older and invite cardiovascular diseases and diabetes as compared to women who are active and exercise regularly. “Our study found cells age faster with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronological age doesn’t always match biological age,” said…

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Tired and Weak? Don’t Assume it’s Just Your Age

Tired and Weak? Don’t Assume it’s Just Your Age

When Christopher Callahan examines older patients, he often hears a similar refrain. “I’m tired, doctor. It’s hard to get up and about. I’ve been feeling kind of down, but I know I’m getting old and I just have to live with it.” This fatalistic stance relies on widely held but mistaken assumptions about what constitutes normal aging. In fact, fatigue, weakness and depression aren’t to-be-expected consequences of growing older, said Callahan, director of the Center for Aging Research at Indiana University’s School of Medicine. Instead, they’re a signal that something…

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Men’s long working hours, short sleep may harm health in old age

Men’s long working hours, short sleep may harm health in old age

Men’s long working hours, short sleep may harm health in old age (Getty Images) Working long hours and skimping on sleep in midlife may lead to poorer physical health in old age, according to a study from Finland. A quarter-century study of Finnish businessmen found those who worked more than 50 hours a week and slept less than 47 hours weekly when they were middle aged were in worse physical health as old men than peers who had healthier work and sleep habits when they were in their prime. “The…

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Age – an important factor that links cancer, sugar-sweetened beverages

Age – an important factor that links cancer, sugar-sweetened beverages

A new study has come up with more information on how cancer and sugar-sweetened beverages are linked. A study conducted by researchers at LSU Health New Orleans suggests that age is an important factor in the association between cancer and sugar-sweetened beverages and recommends that intervention programs to reduce consumption of added sugar be focused on lower socio-economic status, young males, as well as cervical cancer survivors. Sugar intake or sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has been demonstrated to have a positive association with obesity, diabetes and cardio-metabolic diseases, as well as…

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