Every childhood vaccine may go into a single jab

Every childhood vaccine may go into a single jab

A technology that could eventually see every childhood vaccine delivered in a single injection has been developed by US researchers. Their one-shot solution stores the vaccine in microscopic capsules that release the initial dose and then boosters at specific times. The approach has been shown to work in mouse studies, described in the journal Science. The researchers say the technology could help patients around the world. Childhood immunisations come with tears and screams. And there are a lot of them. Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, Hib and hepatitis B at…

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Men, take note: Bariatric surgery may reduce your fertility rate

Men, take note: Bariatric surgery may reduce your fertility rate

Men undergoing bariatric surgery may be at increased risk of sperm aberrations and lower fertility rates despite improvements in weight, androgen levels and sexual quality of life. Researchers discussed the possible impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) on male reproductive capability. Previous research suggested that weight loss through bariatric surgery can help combat premature ageing. The team compared the long-term effects of weight loss following RYGB among a group of sexually active men attempting to conceive with a partner to the semen parameters and fertility of obese men who did not…

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Indian retail may grow to Rs 85 lakh crore by 2021: Report

Indian retail may grow to Rs 85 lakh crore by 2021: Report

Indian retail industry, growing at 10 per cent, may almost double to Rs 85 trillion (lakh crore) by 2021 steered by consumer data and technology disruptions, says a joint report by Ficci and Deloitte. According to the report, consumer data and technology disruptions will drive retail and FMCG sectors towards a new phase of growth where consumer experience will be the focal concern for all retailers and brands. “Consumer retail forms an integral part of the industry with current estimated size of more than Rs 45 trillion. It is further…

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Do you drink tap water? Beware, it may contain harmful plastic particles

Do you drink tap water? Beware, it may contain harmful plastic particles

While the health risks are unknown, the researchers pointed to previous findings that plastic particles can absorb, and release, potentially harmful chemicals and bacteria. For the survey, 159 tap water samples were analysed of which 83% were found to contain plastic particles, researchers from the University of Minnesota and the State University of New York wrote in a report titled Invisibles: The plastic inside us. While much research has focused on plastic pollution of lakes, rivers, the ocean, beaches, even the air we breathe, less attention has been paid to its…

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Your pace of walking may predict heart disease, mortality risk

Your pace of walking may predict heart disease, mortality risk

Are you a middle-aged person with a slow walking pace? If yes, you might be at a higher risk of developing heart disease compared to those who walk steady or at a brisk pace, researchers have found. The study revealed that middle-aged people, both men and women, who reported that they are slow walkers were around twice as likely to have a heart-related death compared to brisk walkers. “This suggests that habitual walking pace is an independent predictor of heart-related death,” said Professor Tom Yates, reader at the University of…

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Do you often take antibiotics? Beware, it may affect your immune system

Do you often take antibiotics? Beware, it may affect your immune system

Researchers at the University of Virginia’s school of medicine in Charlottesville, US have found that antibiotic use made neutrophils less effective in fighting infections and weakened the intestinal barrier against invading bugs. Researcher Koji Watanabe said that neutrophils play an important role as a first-line ‘innate immune response’ when foreign pathogens invade. “We found that antibiotic disruption of the natural microbes in the gut prevented this from happening properly, leaving the gut susceptible to severe infection,” Watanabe added. The team used lab mice to determine how the decrease in natural intestinal flora…

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Depression may alter brain structure

Depression may alter brain structure

An individual suffering from depression may be at an increased risk of developing changes in the structure of the brain associated with communication and thinking skills, researchers say. The findings showed that alterations were found in parts of the brain known as white matter, which contains fibre tracts that enable brain cells to communicate with one another by electrical signals. White matter is a key component of the brain’s wiring and its disruption has been linked to problems with emotion processing and thinking skills, the researchers said. Further, people with…

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Ayurvedic Wisdom: Eating These 8 Foods Everyday May Make You Live Longer

Ayurvedic Wisdom: Eating These 8 Foods Everyday May Make You Live Longer

While its true that our life expectancy has increased over the years, but so has the incidence of chronic ailments. Let’s face it, our generation is at a higher risk of developing heart trouble or vision problems or arthritis at a much younger age now than before. This is indicative of the fact that a lot of lifestyle changes have taken place since our grandmother’s time that may not be in our favour and could be increasing our health risks. Our diet, for instance, is far from what our grandmothers…

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Novel eye test may help diagnose autism

Novel eye test may help diagnose autism

A new eye test that can reveal impairment in cerebellum may help identify people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), researchers say. The cerebellum — part of the brain which coordinates and regulates muscular activity — controls the actions of rapid eye movements made when shifting attention from one object to another, known as saccades. In healthy individuals, these saccades are rapid, precise, and accurate, redirecting the line of sight from one point of interest to another. Conversely, in individuals with autism, the activity was found impaired, as a result of alteration in…

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Smoking may increase sensitivity to social stress: Study

Smoking may increase sensitivity to social stress: Study

Lighting a cigarette may not be a good way to relax and it may increase sensitivity to social stress, according to a new study by the French National Centre for Scientific Research published on Tuesday. Researchers found that exposure to nicotine, rather than withdrawal from it, which is commonly seen as anxiety-inducing in smokers, produced a stressing effect on lab mice, reports Efe news. “(The experiments) suggest that nicotine could enhance the effects of stress,” said Philippe Faure, the centre’s head of research, during the study’s presentation in Paris. Scientists from…

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