Parents, here are some effective techniques to ease your child’s vaccination pain

Parents, here are some effective techniques to ease your child’s vaccination pain

The pain of jabs can sometimes be a barrier to getting kids vaccinated, but according to a recent study, the pokes don’t have to be so petrifying, and parents can actually play a big role in soothing the sting. The research from York University’s OUCH Cohort at the Faculty of Health found that the amount of distress and pain felt by a preschooler during a vaccination is strongly related to how their parents help them cope before and during an appointment. In the study, researchers used the data from 548…

Read More

Only some shoe inserts tied to lower risk of injuries

Only some shoe inserts tied to lower risk of injuries

Contoured orthotics designed to alter the gait while walking and running might help lower the risk of stress fractures, but shock-absorbing insoles probably won’t prevent these injuries, a recent review suggests. Researchers analyzed data from 11 trials of foot orthotics and seven studies of shock-absorbing insoles that, combined, included more than 3,200 people. Overall, foot orthotics were tied to a 28 percent lower risk of injuries and a 41 percent lower risk of stress fractures, the study found. Shock-absorbing insoles, however, were not linked to a statistically meaningful reduction in…

Read More

How to Fit in Some Fitness Amid The Holiday Hustle

How to Fit in Some Fitness Amid The Holiday Hustle

The holidays – high on social and food festivities and low on work and working out – are soon upon us. But my wish, as a fitness trainer and general wellness enthusiast, is for you to exercise not less but, if anything, more, because you probably will consume greater-than-usual amounts of fat and sugar – great fuel for physical exertion. You might say: I will be out of my element, visiting family where there are no sidewalks and where I can’t go to my favorite class or run with my…

Read More

Some Babies May Need Allergy Tests Before Trying Peanuts

Some Babies May Need Allergy Tests Before Trying Peanuts

Most of the time, parents can safely feed peanuts to babies on their own, but infants with a history of allergies should still get a checkup first, a research review confirms. “If your infant has a history of an allergic disorder (i.e. eczema, food allergy), we would recommend that he/she be evaluated for a peanut allergy by an allergist, before introducing a peanut containing product at home,” said lead study author Dr. Sara Anvari of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. “Also, when introducing peanuts at…

Read More

Are Some Kids Genetically More Vulnerable to Food Advertising?

Are Some Kids Genetically More Vulnerable to Food Advertising?

Children exposed to food advertisements are more likely to overeat, especially if they have a specific version of a gene linked to obesity, a recent study suggests. A gene known as the fat mass and obesity-associated gene, or FTO, comes in various slightly different versions, and was the first to be linked to obesity by genetic studies, the researchers write October 18 in the International Journal of Obesity. These kinds of genes interacting with an environment full of junk food ads may make children more likely to reach for a…

Read More

Some Breastfeeding Advice Worth Ditching: US Task Force

Some Breastfeeding Advice Worth Ditching: US Task Force

A review of scientific evidence on breastfeeding out today found that some long-held advice is worth ditching, including that babies should avoid pacifiers and moms should breastfeed exclusively in the first days after birth. Individual interventions to help expectant and new moms breastfeed are still recommended, but systematic or hospital-wide policies tend to show little benefit, said the report by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), an independent panel of experts. The benefits of breastfeeding include providing optimal nutrition and an immune system boost for babies, while helping mothers…

Read More

Calcium Supplements Tied to Higher Dementia Risk for Some Women

Calcium Supplements Tied to Higher Dementia Risk for Some Women

Some older women who take calcium supplements commonly recommended to ward off age-related bone damage may face an increased risk of developing dementia, a small study suggests. The heightened dementia risk appears limited to women who have had a stroke or suffer from other disorders that affect blood flow to the brain, researchers report in the journal Neurology. “Our study is the first to show a relationship between calcium supplementation and increased risk for dementia in older women,” said lead author Dr. Silke Kern of the University of Gothenburg in…

Read More

Soda and other sweet drinks tied to risk for some rare cancers

Soda and other sweet drinks tied to risk for some rare cancers

People who drink lots of soda or other sugary beverages may have a higher risk of developing rare cancers in the gallbladder and bile ducts around the liver, a Swedish study suggests. Little is known about the causes of biliary tract and gallbladder tumors, but emerging evidence suggests obesity as well as elevated blood sugar levels that are a hallmark of diabetes may increase the risk of these malignancies. Because sodas and other sugary drinks have been linked to high blood sugar and weight gain, researchers wondered if these beverages…

Read More

Oestrogen Patch May Cut Alzheimer’s Risk in Some Women

Oestrogen Patch May Cut Alzheimer’s Risk in Some Women

PhotoCredit:istock Administering the primary female sex hormone oestrogen via a skin patch shortly after menopause may reduce Alzheimer’s risk in women, suggests new research. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, found that newly postmenopausal women who received oestrogen via a skin patch had reduced beta-amyloid deposits, the sticky plaques found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. “This study showed, for the first time, that the brain amyloid deposition — a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease — is reduced in newly postmenopausal women who received 17beta-Estradiol patch…

Read More

Oestrogen patch may cut Alzheimer’s risk in some women

Oestrogen patch may cut Alzheimer’s risk in some women

Administering the primary female sex hormone oestrogen via a skin patch shortly after menopause may reduce Alzheimer’s risk in women, suggests new research. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, found that newly postmenopausal women who received oestrogen via a skin patch had reduced beta-amyloid deposits, the sticky plaques found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. “This study showed, for the first time, that the brain amyloid deposition — a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease — is reduced in newly postmenopausal women who received 17beta-Estradiol patch form…

Read More