Drug for Kidney Disease Tied to Infection Risk

Drug for Kidney Disease Tied to Infection Risk

A clinical trial was stopped early when researchers discovered that patients on the drug — a corticosteroid called methylprednisolone — suffered a concerning number of serious side effects. Most often, that meant severe infections, including pneumonia and meningitis. Overall, nearly 15 percent of patients on the drug had a serious “adverse event” over two years, the investigators found. That compared with 3 percent of patients given placebo pills, the researchers reported. The study focused on patients with a form of kidney disease called immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy. It arises when…

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Only some shoe inserts tied to lower risk of injuries

Only some shoe inserts tied to lower risk of injuries

Contoured orthotics designed to alter the gait while walking and running might help lower the risk of stress fractures, but shock-absorbing insoles probably won’t prevent these injuries, a recent review suggests. Researchers analyzed data from 11 trials of foot orthotics and seven studies of shock-absorbing insoles that, combined, included more than 3,200 people. Overall, foot orthotics were tied to a 28 percent lower risk of injuries and a 41 percent lower risk of stress fractures, the study found. Shock-absorbing insoles, however, were not linked to a statistically meaningful reduction in…

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Sleep Apnea Tied to Diabetes and Hypertension During Pregnancy

Sleep Apnea Tied to Diabetes and Hypertension During Pregnancy

Pregnant women who experience certain breathing problems during sleep may be more likely to develop complications like high blood pressure and diabetes, recent U.S. research suggests. In the study of more than 3,000 women, researchers did home-based sleep studies twice during pregnancy to check for what’s known as apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder that involves repeated stops and starts in breathing. Risk factors for sleep apnea include older age and obesity. Women who had sleep apnea were almost twice as likely to develop what’s known as preeclampsia, a type…

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Past Depression Tied to Worse Breast Cancer Survival Odds

Past Depression Tied to Worse Breast Cancer Survival Odds

Women with a history of depression may have lower survival odds with breast cancer than patients without past mental health problems, research in Denmark suggests. In the study of more than 45,000 women with early-stage breast malignancies, 13 percent of patients previously treated with antidepressants died within five years of their cancer diagnosis, compared with 11 percent of women who hadn’t ever taken medication for depression. “We did not find that women with depression were diagnosed at later stages,” said lead study author Dr. Nis Palm Suppli of the Danish…

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Vitamin D Levels Tied to Breast Cancer Survival

Vitamin D Levels Tied to Breast Cancer Survival

For women diagnosed with breast cancer, high vitamin D levels in the blood may be tied to better odds of surviving and having tumors with less deadly characteristics, suggests a new study. While the new study supports previous research on vitamin D and breast cancer, it can’t prove that boosting vitamin D levels will improve outcomes for women with breast cancer. “Overall, we found a 30 percent reduction of all-cause mortality associated with vitamin D levels at the time of diagnosis,” said the study’s lead author Song Yao, of the…

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Distress and Depression With Type 2 Diabetes Tied to Skipping Meds

Distress and Depression With Type 2 Diabetes Tied to Skipping Meds

People with type 2 diabetes who also have symptoms of distress or depression are more likely than others to miss or skip their diabetes medications, according to a recent study. “Although it would seem intuitive to expect that depression would make the already difficult job of diabetes self-management that much harder, the available data have not been very clear,” lead author Jeffrey S. Gonzalez of Yeshiva University in New York said by email. It is clear, however, that treating depression may be necessary though it is unlikely to be sufficient…

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Antidepressants in Pregnancy tied to Health Risks for Kids

Antidepressants in Pregnancy tied to Health Risks for Kids

Children exposed to a common type of antidepressant in the womb may be at an increased risk of complications soon after birth and years later, according to two new studies. One study suggests newborns are more likely to need intensive care after birth if their mothers take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy. A second study finds those same children may be at an increased risk for speech and language disorders years later. Links between SSRIs and these types of birth outcomes have been seen before in previous studies…

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Teenage Weight Tied to Odds of Diabetes-Related Death

Teenage Weight Tied to Odds of Diabetes-Related Death

The increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and eventually dying from the disease, begins early in life and at weights in the “normal” range, a new study suggests. Researchers followed the fates of millions of Israeli teenagers weighed at age 17, and found a steady increase in the likelihood of death from diabetes-related causes up to age 70 that was tied to heavier weights in the teen years. “This study provides further evidence for the urgent need for firm public health actions to overcome the childhood obesity epidemic, as…

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Job Insecurity Tied to Increased Risk of Diabetes

Job Insecurity Tied to Increased Risk of Diabetes

People who are worried about losing their jobs may be more likely to be diagnosed withdiabetes, according to a new analysis. Compared to people who felt secure in their jobs, people who were experiencing so-called job insecurity had a 19 percent higher rate of new cases of diabetes, which researchers called a “modest increased risk.” The study can’t prove that job insecurity causes diabetes. Still, said lead author Jane Ferrie, “In an ideal world, the sort of thing I’d like to see come out of this study is a reduction…

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High Resting Heart Rate Tied to African American Heart Failure Risk

High Resting Heart Rate Tied to African American Heart Failure Risk

For African Americans, a high resting heart rate may indicate greater risk of death or hospitalization with heart failure, a recent analysis finds. This had already been shown in studies that mostly involved white participants, but it wasn’t clear if the same was true in the black community, researchers write in JAMA Cardiology. “Resting” heart rate is measured when a person is sitting or lying down, calm and moving as little as possible. For a person who isn’t ill, a heart rate anywhere between 60 and 100 beats per minute…

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