Apple Hires Man Who 3D-Printed His Brain Tumour: Report

Apple Hires Man Who 3D-Printed His Brain Tumour: Report

Apple has hired Steven Keating, the doctoral student from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who made a 3D printout of his own brain after he was diagnosed with a tumour, a media report said. According to a report in CNBC on Friday, it is still not known whether Keating is working on one of Apple’s teams dedicated to health care or he has joined another team that can take advantage of his expertise in mechanical engineering. Keating made headlines in 2015 after revealing the depths of his science experiment to…

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Scientists Device Blood Test to Detect Cancer and Locate Tumour

Scientists Device Blood Test to Detect Cancer and Locate Tumour

If cancer is painful, the treatment to prevent it is no less pain either. Ask any cancer survivor, no matter how hard he tries he would able to explain you the excruciating pains he went through in the procedure to extract the tumour out of his body and would only wish that nobody else has to go through the same ordeal. A cancer tumour is group of cells, which starts competing with the normal cells of the body for nutrients and kills them in the process of its malignant proliferation….

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Prostate cancer spread can be predicted through tumour cells in blood samples

Prostate cancer spread can be predicted through tumour cells in blood samples

Prostate cancer spread can be predicted through tumour cells in blood samples (Shutterstock Images) A new study says that researchers have found a group of circulating tumour cells in prostate cancer patient blood samples which are linked to the spread of the disease. This is the first time these cell types have been shown to be a promising marker for prostate cancer spread. In a study, presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool, of around 80 samples from men with prostate cancer, scientists at the…

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Cholesterol deprivation can kill brain tumour cells

Cholesterol deprivation can kill brain tumour cells

Offering new hope for an alternative treatment of brain cancer, researchers have found that depriving the deadly tumour cells of cholesterol, which they import from neighbouring healthy cells, kills tumour cells and causes their regression. “Disrupting cholesterol import by GBM (glioblastoma) cells caused dramatic cancer cell death and shrank tumours significantly, prolonging the survival of the mice,” said senior author Paul Mischel, Professor at University of California San Diego School of Medicine in the US. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive form of brain cancer, which is…

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New hope for patients with deadly brain tumour

New hope for patients with deadly brain tumour

Non-invasive gene therapy could treat brain tumour (Fatine El Hassani/Getty Images) Researchers have found a potential new way of stopping one of the most aggressive types of brain tumour from spreading, which could also lead the way to better patient survival. Glioblastoma, which is one of the most common types of malignant brain tumours in adults, grow fast as well as spread easily. The tumour has threadlike tendrils that extend into other parts of the brain making it difficult to remove it all, the study from the University of Southampton…

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Tumour hardness may develop cancer cells

Tumour hardness may develop cancer cells

Tumour hardness and hypoxia — lack of oxygen at the tumour’s core — trigger a biological switch that causes cancer stem cells to develop, a recent study has found. This biological switch is critical to a tumour’s ability to invade other tissue — a process called metastasis. “Our study suggests that to combat cancer, we should be developing treatments that target the stiff, hypoxic regions of tumours. We were surprised to see just how important these two properties in the tumour micro-environment — stiffness and hypoxia — were for regulating…

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