Dear moms-to-be, don’t fear Zika virus. A new vaccine can protect your unborn child

Dear moms-to-be, don’t fear Zika virus. A new vaccine can protect your unborn child

The Zika virus has got a lot of people worried. Many efforts are being made by researchers tominimise the transmission and effects of the virus. Pregnant women need to be especially careful as their healths and habits affect the child. Now, researchers have found that immunising women with a Zika vaccine during pregnancy can protect the transmission of virus from mother to her baby in utero. Researchers from the University of Texas’s medical branch at Galveston in the US found that the Zika vaccine can protect unborn child against infection and birth…

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Malaria Kenya Ghana and Malawi get first vaccine

Malaria Kenya Ghana and Malawi get first vaccine

The world’s first vaccine against malaria will be introduced in three countries – Ghana, Kenya and Malawi – starting in 2018. The RTS,S vaccine trains the immune system to attack the malaria parasite, which is spread by mosquito bites. The World Health Organization (WHO) said the jab had the potential to save tens of thousands of lives. But it is not yet clear if it will be feasible to use in the poorest parts of the world. The vaccine needs to be given four times – once a month for…

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These Three African Countries Are Chosen to Pilot the First Ever Malaria Vaccine

These Three African Countries Are Chosen to Pilot the First Ever Malaria Vaccine

The global fight against malaria has finally seen a momentous turn. In its first, three African countries will pilot the first ever vaccine for malaria. “Ghana, Kenya along with Malawi will take part in a WHO-coordinated pilot implementation programme that will make the world’s first malaria vaccine available in selected areas, beginning in 2018,” WHO Regional Office for Africa, website. Plasmodium falciparum is the deadliest form of malaria and to tackle the same in children an injectable vaccine, RTS,S, has been developed. The vaccine will be assessed in the programme…

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GM vaccine for malaria without side effects soon

GM vaccine for malaria without side effects soon

A potent malaria vaccine with virtually no side-effects has cleared clinical trials. The new “highly protective” malaria vaccine was successful in humans and can pave the way for treatment of other parasitic diseases. Scientists from the US genetically engineered the plasmodium parasite that causes the disease, after being passed on from mosquitos, to remove three genes that lead to infection. Although they can’t multiply , they live in the liver and stimulate the body’s defences to repel a real infection. Plasmodium parasites first infect the liver and then blood, leading…

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Vaccine shows promise in fight against breast cancer

Vaccine shows promise in fight against breast cancer

An experimental vaccine is safe and effectively stimulates the immune system leading to regression of early-stage breast cancer, show results of a clinical trial. The researchers created the vaccine from immune cells called dendritic cells that are harvested from each individual patient to create a personalised vaccine. The immune cell vaccine targets the HER2 protein on breast cancer cells. The HER2 protein is overexpressed in 20-25 per cent of all breast cancer tumors and is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Researchers had previously shown that immune cells are…

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World’s first Chikungunya vaccine developed

World’s first Chikungunya vaccine developed

US researchers have developed a vaccine for chikungunyafever made from an insect-specific virus that does not have any effect on people, making the vaccine safe and effective. The study indicated that the vaccine quickly produces a strong immune defense and completely protects mice and nonhuman primates from disease when exposed to the chikungunya virus. The findings were published in journal of Nature Medicine. “This vaccine offers efficient, safe and affordable protection against chikungunya and builds the foundation for using viruses that only infect insects to develop vaccines against other insect-borne…

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Kids Need Just Two Doses of Cancer Vaccine

Kids Need Just Two Doses of Cancer Vaccine

Kids aged 11-12 should get only two doses of a vaccine to prevent cancers caused by human papillomavirus, instead of the previously recommended three shots, US health authorities said Thursday. The updated recommendation from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based on research that shows younger adolescents can get similar protection that way, and may be more likely to get vaccinated if fewer shots are required. HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection that can cause cancers of the head, neck, cervix, penis and anus. Some…

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HIV vaccine a step closer

HIV vaccine a step closer

HIV vaccine a step closer (Getty Images) A recent study at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) shows that holes in HIV’s defensive sugar shield could be important in designing an HIV vaccine. It appears that antibodies can target these holes, which are scattered in HIV’s protective sugar or ‘glycan’ shield and the question is now whether these holes can be exploited to induce protective antibodies. Lead researcher Dennis R. Burton said, “It’s important now to evaluate future vaccine candidates to more rapidly understand the immune response they induce to particular…

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Cocaine addiction vaccine a step closer

Cocaine addiction vaccine a step closer

Brazilian researchers working to develop a vaccine against cocaine addiction have begun test trials on animals. The vaccine has been under development for more than two years, one of the lead researchers, Xinhua news agency reported on Wednesday citing local media. “We are developing a molecule to stimulate the production of antibodies by the immune system against cocaine,” said Professor Angelo de Fatima, of the Organic Chemistry department at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, at Belo Horizonte, in the state of Minas Gerais, in Brazil. “These antibodies bind to…

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New Dengue Vaccine May Up Infection In Low Affected Areas: Study

New Dengue Vaccine May Up Infection In Low Affected Areas: Study

The newly licensed dengue vaccine may actually increase the incidence of infections if used in low transmission areas, a team of international researchers has warned. Dengue — a viral infection that records nearly 400 million cases per year — is spread by mosquitoes, and causes fever, headache, muscle and joint pain. The virus typically causes a mild first infection but a far worse one if someone is infected with the disease a second time, researchers said. The study found that the dengue vaccine with the trade name Dengvaxia can reduce…

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