Genetically-engineered mosquitoes give hope against dengue

Genetically-engineered mosquitoes give hope against dengue

In a first, researchers have genetically engineered mosquitoes that have an increased resistance to infection by the dengue virus. After decades of research and countless control attempts, dengue continues to infect an estimated 390 million people around the world each year. Now, researchers report that mosquitoes carrying dengue virus (DENV) can be genetically engineered, giving an increased resistance to infection by the virus. When a mosquito bites someone infected with DENV, the virus needs to complete its lifecycle in the mosquito’s gut, eventually infecting its salivary glands, before it can…

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‘Fewer mosquitoes now needed to create outbreak’

‘Fewer mosquitoes now needed to create outbreak’

‘Fewer mosquitoes now needed to create outbreak’ (Getty Images) When dengue became a major health problem in Singapore in the 1960s, the state went after dengue-carrying mosquitoes with characteristic zeal. Breeding areas were eliminated, outbreaks were mapped, and citizens were educated. By 1975, dengue had virtually vanished. But since the 1990s, dengue outbreaks have returned to the city-state. This year, cases could exceed 30,000, authorities estimate, which would be a record. Vaishnavi Chandrashekhar spoke to Ooi Eng Eong, deputy director of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Programme at Duke-NUS Medical School…

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‘Fewer mosquitoes now needed to create outbreak’

‘Fewer mosquitoes now needed to create outbreak’

When dengue became a major health problem in Singapore in the 1960s, the state went after dengue-carrying mosquitoes with characteristic zeal. Breeding areas were eliminated, outbreaks were mapped, and citizens were educated. By 1975, dengue had virtually vanished. But since the 1990s, dengue outbreaks have returned to the city-state. This year, cases could exceed 30,000, authorities estimate, which would be a record. Vaishnavi Chandrashekhar spoke to Ooi Eng Eong, deputy director of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Programme at Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, which has the biggest dengue research team…

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Limiting travel, controlling mosquitoes reduces Zika risk

Limiting travel, controlling mosquitoes reduces Zika risk

Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya virus are increasingly common in the Caribbean Basin and Latin Americ… Read More To limit mosquito-borne illnesses, including the Zika virus, plan travel carefully, take personal protective measures, and control mosquitoes in and around the home, experts recommend. In most adults, Zika produces no symptoms or only mild symptoms like fever and rash. But children of women infected in pregnancy may be born with microcephaly, or abnormally small heads, which can be linked to seizures, intellectual disability, hearing loss or vision problems, and has…

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