Higher education doesn’t prevent Alzheimer’s but it can offer a cognitive head start

In a new study, higher education does seem to give Alzheimer’s patients a cognitive head start allowing them to stay intellectually functional longer(Credit: SIphotography/Depositphotos) Scientists have long debated why there seems to be an association between higher levels of education and lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease in later life. New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine is suggesting neurodegenerative disease is just as prevalent in more-educated individuals but a greater cognitive reserve can temporarily mitigate the impact of Alzheimer’s pathology in one’s senior years. Prior studies have consistently uncovered a correlation between higher education…

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Recalling violent incidents may hamper memory, cognitive skills.

People who experience violent incidents in their life and often recall them, even those that happened up to a decade earlier, may be at an increased risk of having short-term memory loss and poor cognitive control, a study has claimed. According to researchers, a stronger short-term memory is positively associated with school attainment, job performance, and with lower probability of contracting Alzheimer’s disease and post-traumatic stress disorder. On the other hand, a weaker cognitive control among children can lead to problems with physical health, higher mortality rates, lower personal wealth and criminal…

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