Too Much Protein Isn’t Good For Your Heart, Says New Study

Too Much Protein Isn’t Good For Your Heart, Says New Study

A group of researchers wanted to look into the long-term effects of one of society’s most popular diets, so they watched the eating habits of over 2,400 Finnish men for more than 20 years. What they found was eating a high-protein diet isn’t entirely harmless as once thought. Foods rich in protein has been the center of controversy in recent years. Some think it’s a good idea to eat large amounts of protein — after all, it’s one of the building blocks of muscle development. Yet some studies say that too much…

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Pacemaker for heart, study suggests leadless variant better than transvenous one

Pacemaker for heart, study suggests leadless variant better than transvenous one

Good news for heart patients. If you want to keep your heart healthy, you should opt for leadless pacemakers over the conventional transvenous variants. While you can you avoid heart attack and stroke risk by following a disciplined exercise and diet routine to keep ensure a healthy heart, you need to be careful with the pacemaker variant you choose after a heart attack. According to a new study, heart patients who opt for leadless pacemakers are likely to have lesser short-term and mid-term complications than those with transvenous pacemakers. Approximately a million pacemakers are annually implanted…

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This wireless device can detect heart dysfunction in cancer survivors

This wireless device can detect heart dysfunction in cancer survivors

Scientists have designed a novel wireless device which may accurately detect heart dysfunction in children who have survived cancer. Childhood cancer survivors are advised to undergo screening for the detection of heart dysfunction because of known anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. However, screening with echocardiography — the standard of care for monitoring heart function — can be highly variable and limited. Another alternative is cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, which is expensive and is not widely accessible. In the study, the team tested Vivio — a prototype handheld instrument which collects pulse waves…

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Heart attack causes and symptoms, study says it’s more deadly during winter

Heart attack causes and symptoms, study says it’s more deadly during winter

Heart attacks are more common during winter than summer months, suggests a new study conducted by cardiologists at UK’s Leeds General Infirmary on a total of 4,056 people. The study subjects received treatment for a heart attack in four separate years. The study found that the most severe heart attacks were more deadly in the coldest months, compared to the warmest. The overall number of heart attacks was roughly the same in the coldest half of the year, compared to the warmer months, with the most serious heart attacks leading to cardiac arrest and cardiogenic shock….

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Want to keep heart healthy and strong? Avoid travelling to high altitudes

Want to keep heart healthy and strong? Avoid travelling to high altitudes

While the mountain air may be refreshing and offer respite from the heat, it is not so good for your heart. A new study improves our understanding of how the human body adapts to high altitude areas. It reveals that at high altitudes (over 3000 m), the lower amount of oxygen in the air leads to a decrease in the volume of blood circulating around the body, and an increase in blood pressure in the lungs.The findings are important for people who live, travel and exercise at high altitudes. The…

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Gut Bacteria Strongly Linked To Cause Of Heart Attack, Says Study

Gut Bacteria Strongly Linked To Cause Of Heart Attack, Says Study

The gut microbiome plays an important role in an individual’s risk for atherosclerosis, one of the major causes of heart attack and stroke, says a study. Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up in the arteries. The researchers believe that the new finding could open the door for new treatment options for those patients with unexplained plaque build-up in the arteries. In order to understand the role that bacteria in the gut may play in atherosclerosis, the researchers examined blood levels of metabolic products of the intestinal microbiome….

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Vitamin pills are bad for heart and have no health benefits, says study

Vitamin pills are bad for heart and have no health benefits, says study

The most commonly consumed vitamin and mineral supplements provide no consistent health benefit or harm, a study has found. Researchers from the St Michael’s Hospital and the University of Toronto in Canada conducted a systematic review of existing data and single randomised control trials published in English from January 2012 to October 2017. They found that multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium and vitamin C – the most common supplements – showed no advantage or added risk in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke or premature death. Generally, vitamin and…

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Switch off the TV, too much screen time can cause heart disease and cancer

Switch off the TV, too much screen time can cause heart disease and cancer

Spending too much time watching TV can be injurious to health. A new study done by the University of Glasgow and published in BMC Medicine reveals a link between higher risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease. The effect was more among those with low fitness, low muscle strength or physical activity levels. Previous studies linked increased screen time with bowel cancer for men as well as diabetes, obesity and a weak heart. Discretionary screen time, time spent watching TV or looking at a computer screen during leisure time, is an important contributor to…

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Young women who have hypertension are at an increased risk of heart failure post delivery

Young women who have hypertension are at an increased risk of heart failure post delivery

Young women suffering from hypertension are at an increased risk of heart failure within the six weeks after delivery, also known as the postpartum period, according to a study. Heart failure is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and death, affecting relatively young reproductive-age women, especially among those with the presence of an additional disease or condition, such as hypertension. The study found that although less than 2% of all pregnancy-related hospitalisations occurred during the postpartum period, nearly 60% of pregnancy-related heart failure hospitalisations took place during the same time….

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Here’s how depression can impact people suffering from heart diseases

Here’s how depression can impact people suffering from heart diseases

Depression negatively impacts patients with cardiovascular disease, finds a study. About one-fifth of cardiovascular disease patients suffer from depression. “While we don’t know which comes first–depression or cardiovascular disease–the consensus is that depression is a risk marker for cardiovascular disease, meaning if you have cardiovascular disease, there is a higher likelihood that you could also have depression, when compared with the risk in the general population,” said lead author Victor Okunrintemi from Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables, Florida. In one study, Okunrintemi and colleagues evaluated patient experience, health…

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