Anxiety and aggression in young boys may increase due to low iron levels

Anxiety and aggression in young boys may increase due to low iron levels

Iron deficiency and low blood levels of Vitamin B12 in small boys may be associated with behaviour problems, such as anxiety and aggression, when they get in middle school, according to a new study. The findings showed that iron deficiency, anaemia and low plasma vitamin B12 levels in boys at around age 8 were associated with 10% higher mean scores on externalising behaviours such as aggression and breaking of rules. Iron deficiency was related to an adjusted 12% higher mean on internalising problem scores like anxiety and depression. “Some parts…

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Smoking may increase sensitivity to social stress: Study

Smoking may increase sensitivity to social stress: Study

Lighting a cigarette may not be a good way to relax and it may increase sensitivity to social stress, according to a new study by the French National Centre for Scientific Research published on Tuesday. Researchers found that exposure to nicotine, rather than withdrawal from it, which is commonly seen as anxiety-inducing in smokers, produced a stressing effect on lab mice, reports Efe news. “(The experiments) suggest that nicotine could enhance the effects of stress,” said Philippe Faure, the centre’s head of research, during the study’s presentation in Paris. Scientists from…

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High-Dose Radiotherapy May Increase Lifespan of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

High-Dose Radiotherapy May Increase Lifespan of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

Cancer is a deadly disease that affects millions worldwide. There are various treatments available to help combat the disease; a common technique being radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, also known as radiation therapy, is commonly used as a treatment for cancer as well as thyroid and blood disorders. With the use of radiation, the DNA of cancerous cells are broken to disrupt their growth or to kill them completely. For cancer treatment, ionising radiation method is used, which are a high-energy form of radiation. While it has proved to show good results in…

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Shocking: Zero Pollution and Clean Water May Increase Asthma Risk in Kids

Shocking: Zero Pollution and Clean Water May Increase Asthma Risk in Kids

Pollution has almost become a way of life, particularly in India. We are so used to it that we don’t think of it as a serious threat to our lives. The capital city New Delhi is considered to be the most polluted city in the world, and the consequences of it are evident with cases of respiratory diseases going up rapidly over the years. It is a serious concern and we need to make a conscious effort to prevent its health risks. Perhaps packing our bags and heading to a…

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How to Increase Your IQ: 8 Fun Brain Exercises to Try Everyday

How to Increase Your IQ: 8 Fun Brain Exercises to Try Everyday

Now, who doesn’t like to be brainy or called an Einstein? We all aspire to be the intelligent one, who can answer all the tricky questions at the snap of the fingers while the others gaze and wonder. The brain is a miraculous organ with incredible capabilities, and good intelligence can take you a long way towards your road to success. So how can you work on it? In the early 1900s, a German Psychologist called William Stern coined the term “IQ”, which means Intelligence Quotient, and it referred to…

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Low Protein Levels May Increase Kidney Function Decline in Elderly

Low Protein Levels May Increase Kidney Function Decline in Elderly

Older adults with low blood levels of a circulating protein in the blood may be at an increased risk of experiencing decline in their kidney function, a study has found. The findings showed that higher blood levels of a protein called soluble klotho — with anti-ageing properties — may help preserve kidney function. “We found a strong association between low soluble klotho and decline in kidney function, independent of many known risk factors for kidney function decline,” said David Drew from Tufts University in Massachusetts, US. The kidney has the…

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Sunbeds May Increase Risk of Deadly Skin Cancer

Sunbeds May Increase Risk of Deadly Skin Cancer

You may want to skip that sunbed after swimming, according to a new study. Sunbeds which are used in indoor tanning emit harmful UV radiation to produce a cosmetic tan. They are typically found in tanning salons, spas, gyms and sporting facilities. Using sunbeds may put people at a higher risk of melanoma – the most dangerous type of skin cancer. In the last decade, melanoma has the strongest increase in incidence and the incidence rates have in fact never been as high as in 2014. The World Health Organisation…

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Can Moderate Screen Time Increase Teenagers’ Well-Being?

Can Moderate Screen Time Increase Teenagers’ Well-Being?

Spending hours in front of digital screen may be harmful for adolescents. However, moderate use may not harm but increase their well-being, researchers say. “Digital screens are now an inextricable part of modern childhood. Our findings suggest that adolescents’ moderate screen use has no detectable link to well-being and levels of engagement above these points are modestly correlated with well-being,” said lead researcher Andrew Przybylski, psychological scientist at the University of Oxford. The findings showed that as a result of a digital “sweet spot” between low and high technology use,…

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Epilepsy drugs may increase birth defect risk

Epilepsy drugs may increase birth defect risk

Exposure to certain anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy may put women at higher risk of having a child with a malformation, or birth defect, says a study. The study based on systematic review of 50 published studies found that exposure in the womb to the anti-epileptic drug sodium valproate was associated with a 10 per cent chance of the child having a significant birth defect and this rose as the dose of the drug increased. The types of birth defect that were increased were skeletal and limb defects, cardiac defects,…

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Shorter Sleep May Increase Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Drinks

Shorter Sleep May Increase Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Drinks

People who sleep five or fewer hours a night are likely to drink significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, such as sodas and energy drinks, according to a new study. “We think there may be a positive feedback loop where sugary drinks and sleep loss reinforce one another, making it harder for people to eliminate their unhealthy sugar habit,” said Aric A. Prather, assistant professor at the University of California San Francisco. “This data suggests that improving people’s sleep could potentially help them break out of the cycle and cut down…

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