Saving for your child’s foreign education? Invest in US index funds

Thanks to remarkable progress in science and technology, the US has witnessed unprecedented growth in the recent past. It is no surprise that the S&P 500, an index of the top 500 publicly traded US companies is weighted towards prominent American tech giants. Furthermore, looking at the S&P 500 from 2001 to 2020, the average US stock market return for the last 20 years is around 7.45 percent. So, if you invested $100 in the S&P 500 at the beginning of 2000, you would have about $421 at the beginning of…

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Global Vice Index: Cigarettes, alcohol cheapest in Luxembourg, most expensive in Ukraine

The cost of maintaining a drugs, booze and cigarettes habit got a lot more expensive in the U.S. last year, rising the most of almost anywhere in the world, the annual Bloomberg Global Vice Index shows. Americans had to fork out over $200 more for a basket of so-called vice goods last year versus 2016, with only New Zealand seeing a bigger increase. The gauge compares the share of income needed to maintain a broad weekly habit of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, amphetamines, cocaine and opioids across more than 100 countries.…

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India Ranks Low on the Healthcare Index and Fails to Achieve Goals

According to the latest Global Burden of Disease study published in the renowned journal Lancet, India has shown poor performance in terms of quality, availability and access to healthcare facilities. It currently ranks at 154 out of 195 countries on the healthcare index that is way below countries like China, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. The study indicates that despite a boost in socio-economic development, India has failed to achieve its healthcare goals and the gap between the predicted and the actual score has only been widening over the last 25 years.…

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World Diabetes Day 2016: Understanding the Glycaemic Index of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates present in food have a direct impact on your blood sugar levels. Every time you eat, carbohydrates are broken down to glucose molecules which pass into the blood stream from where they enter the cells and are used as fuel for different body functions. The excess glucose is converted into fat in some cells and stored for later use. Insulin, a hormone produced by our pancreas, is the key that opens the cell doors to allow glucose to enter. People who have diabetes are either completely missing this key…

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