Adding cabbage and broccoli to your diet may help prevent colon cancer

Adding cabbage and broccoli to your diet may help prevent colon cancer

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a study has found. The research, published in the journal Immunity, shows that mice fed on a diet rich in indole-3-carbinol – which is produced when we digest vegetables from the Brassica genus – were protected from gut inflammation and colon cancer. While the health benefits of vegetables are well-established, many of the mechanisms behind them remain unknown. This study offers the first concrete evidence of how I3C in…

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Adding cabbage and broccoli to your diet may help prevent colon cancer

Adding cabbage and broccoli to your diet may help prevent colon cancer

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a study has found. The research, published in the journal Immunity, shows that mice fed on a diet rich in indole-3-carbinol – which is produced when we digest vegetables from the Brassica genus – were protected from gut inflammation and colon cancer. While the health benefits of vegetables are well-established, many of the mechanisms behind them remain unknown. This study offers the first concrete evidence of how I3C in…

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Aspirin, a drug commonly available, may help prevent HIV

Aspirin, a drug commonly available, may help prevent HIV

An affordable, globally available drug – low-dose aspirin – could help prevent HIV transmission, scientists say. HIV infection rates remain unacceptably high, especially among young African women. Researchers including those from University of Manitoba in Canada tested the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA or aspirin) and other anti-inflammatory drugs on HIV target cells in a group of Kenyan women who were at low risk for HIV. The pilot study, published in the Journal of the International AIDS Society, built on existing knowledge about the role of inflammation in HIV transmission….

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Sugar-free, calorie free: Artificial sweeteners may not help with weight loss

Sugar-free, calorie free: Artificial sweeteners may not help with weight loss

If you feel artificial sweeteners are a perfect substitute to sugar, you might want to think again. Marketed as ‘sugar-free’ or ‘diet option’, artificial sweeteners – commonly found in a variety of food and beverages, including soft drinks, chewing gum, jellies – give a person the same pleasure as sugar but reduce the calories. But, are these popularly marketed sweeteners the right choice? “People who are weight conscious or suffering from diabetes or cardiac problems usually prefer artificial sweeteners over table sugar as they are calorie-free. However, many would not…

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Beware! Passive Smoking May Up Snoring Risk In Kids

Beware! Passive Smoking May Up Snoring Risk In Kids

Parents who smoke at home exposing their children to passive tobacco inhalation may increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in kids, according to a study. The findings showed that children are at a two per cent higher risk of snoring for every cigarette smoke in home daily. Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children. While mothers who smoke increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in their kids by nearly 90 per cent. Those exposed to prenatal…

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Amsterdam may be a ‘party city’ but you could be fined for rowdy behaviour

Amsterdam may be a ‘party city’ but you could be fined for rowdy behaviour

Amsterdam on Thursday warned rowdy British and Dutch tourists who “party excessively” in the city that they could face stiff fines, in the latest campaign to halt drunken mayhem on the streets. The campaign specifically targets men aged between 18 to 34 years, who are increasingly attracted by the freewheeling Dutch capital’s beer-drinking and soft-drug culture, as well as the salacious draw of its red light district. Enticed by cheap travel, groups of young men — mainly from elsewhere in the Netherlands or Britain — frequently roam the inner city’s…

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Psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder may be genetic

Psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder may be genetic

Scientists have found that some psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be genetic, whereas neurological disorders like Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s, appeared more distinct. The study indicated that psychiatric disorders are likely to have important similarities at a molecular level, which current diagnostic categories do not reflect. “This work is starting to re-shape how we think about disorders of the brain. If we can uncover the genetic influences and patterns of overlap between different disorders, then we might be able to better understand the root causes of these conditions…

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Daily Aspirin May Double Skin Cancer Risk In Men

Daily Aspirin May Double Skin Cancer Risk In Men

Men taking aspirin every day may have double the risk of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, compared to those who are not exposed to daily to the common pain reliever, says a large study involving almost 200,000 patients. Melanoma is a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes. It typically occur in the skin, but may rarely occur in the mouth, intestines or eye. The researchers suggested that among the numerous possibilities, one reason men may be more vulnerable could be related to males…

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Drinking baking soda may help combat rheumatoid arthritis

Drinking baking soda may help combat rheumatoid arthritis

Drinking baking soda daily may help reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, say scientists. While the immune system normally protects us from disease and infection, in someone who has an autoimmune disease the immune system attacks healthy cells in the body by mistake. Drinking baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, tells the spleen — which is part of the immune system — to go easy on the immune response, the study said. “Certainly drinking bicarbonate affects the spleen and we think it’s through the mesothelial cells,” said…

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Anxiety and aggression in young boys may increase due to low iron levels

Anxiety and aggression in young boys may increase due to low iron levels

Iron deficiency and low blood levels of Vitamin B12 in small boys may be associated with behaviour problems, such as anxiety and aggression, when they get in middle school, according to a new study. The findings showed that iron deficiency, anaemia and low plasma vitamin B12 levels in boys at around age 8 were associated with 10% higher mean scores on externalising behaviours such as aggression and breaking of rules. Iron deficiency was related to an adjusted 12% higher mean on internalising problem scores like anxiety and depression. “Some parts…

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