Higher education doesn’t prevent Alzheimer’s but it can offer a cognitive head start

In a new study, higher education does seem to give Alzheimer’s patients a cognitive head start allowing them to stay intellectually functional longer(Credit: SIphotography/Depositphotos) Scientists have long debated why there seems to be an association between higher levels of education and lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease in later life. New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine is suggesting neurodegenerative disease is just as prevalent in more-educated individuals but a greater cognitive reserve can temporarily mitigate the impact of Alzheimer’s pathology in one’s senior years. Prior studies have consistently uncovered a correlation between higher education…

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Adding cabbage and broccoli to your diet may help prevent colon cancer

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a study has found. The research, published in the journal Immunity, shows that mice fed on a diet rich in indole-3-carbinol – which is produced when we digest vegetables from the Brassica genus – were protected from gut inflammation and colon cancer. While the health benefits of vegetables are well-established, many of the mechanisms behind them remain unknown. This study offers the first concrete evidence of how I3C in…

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Adding cabbage and broccoli to your diet may help prevent colon cancer

Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a study has found. The research, published in the journal Immunity, shows that mice fed on a diet rich in indole-3-carbinol – which is produced when we digest vegetables from the Brassica genus – were protected from gut inflammation and colon cancer. While the health benefits of vegetables are well-established, many of the mechanisms behind them remain unknown. This study offers the first concrete evidence of how I3C in…

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Aspirin, a drug commonly available, may help prevent HIV

An affordable, globally available drug – low-dose aspirin – could help prevent HIV transmission, scientists say. HIV infection rates remain unacceptably high, especially among young African women. Researchers including those from University of Manitoba in Canada tested the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA or aspirin) and other anti-inflammatory drugs on HIV target cells in a group of Kenyan women who were at low risk for HIV. The pilot study, published in the Journal of the International AIDS Society, built on existing knowledge about the role of inflammation in HIV transmission.…

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How to Prevent Annoying (and Painful) UTIs

The stats don’t lie: 50% of women experience a urinary tract infection (UTI) at one point or another. And with each subsequent infection, your risk of a recurrent ones goes up, according to the National Institutes of Health. While the painful symptoms like burning or stinging with urination may seem bad enough, the risk of a dangerous kidney infection means this common condition can also become a scary (and expensive) experience. Avoid developing UTIs in the first place with these tips from Dr. Sherry Ross, OB/GYN, author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Your…

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Dear runners, take note. Here’s how you can effectively prevent back pain

If you’re a runner who experiences back pain, here’s what you need to do. Researchers from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center examined what may cause chronic back pain in runners and the exercises to help prevent it. A study suggests that runners with weak deep core muscles are at higher risk of developing low back pain. And, unfortunately, most people’s deep core muscles aren’t nearly as strong as they should be. To examine the role of the superficial and deep core muscles, researchers used motion detection technology and…

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Marmite could prevent miscarriages and birth defects, study shows

Love it or hate it, it turns out that marmite is actually pretty good for our health. Earlier this year we reported that the salty breakfast staple has been shown to boost brain function, and now it seems that it may also be beneficial for pregnant women and their unborn babies, too. A 12-year Australian study has concluded that marmite can reduce the risk of miscarriage and birth defects, as the high levels of vitamin B3 it contains work to treat molecular deficiencies in pregnant women. The research Scientists used genetic sequencing on…

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Brain Activity and Good Diet May Prevent Insomnia-Related Depression

al feedback as well as reinforce behaviours that are rewarded, while reducing behaviours that are not. The results showed that those who were less susceptible to the effects of poor sleep showed significantly higher brain activity in response to positive feedback or reward compared to negative feedback. The effects of poor sleep showed significantly higher brain activity “Poor sleep is not good, but you may have other experiences during your life that are positive. And the more responsive you are to those positive experiences, the less vulnerable you may be…

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Brain Activity and Good Diet May Prevent Insomnia-Related Depression

While lack of sleep is a major risk factor for depression, not everyone who tosses and turns at night becomes depressed. According to a study, individuals whose brains are more attuned to rewards may be protected from the negative mental health effects of poor sleep. The findings revealed that students with poor quality sleep were less likely to have symptoms of depression if they also had higher activity in a reward-sensitive region of the brain. “This helps us begin to understand why some people are more likely to experience depression when they have problems…

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Stress hormones can prevent disorders after a traumatic event

In a recent study, a group of researchers have found that the Ppm1f (Protein phosphatase 1f) gene is altered when exposed to traumatic stress and is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety. People who have suffered from traffic accidents, war combat, terrorist attacks and exposure to other traumatic events have an increased likelihood of developing diseases. These diseases can be psychological and physical, such as heart problems and cancer. The current preventive treatments based on psychological support and drugs are effective in some cases. Unfortunately, these treatments do…

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