Eating walnuts may lower depression risk: Study

The United States of America found that depression scores were 26 per cent lower for walnut consumers and eight per cent lower for consumers of other nuts, compared to those who did not eat nuts at all. Walnuts may lower depression risk: Study  |  Photo Credit: Getty Images Los Angeles: Consuming walnuts may lower the prevalence and frequency of depression, and improve concentration levels, according to a study carried out in American adults. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the US found that depression scores were 26 per…

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Healthy diet can beat symptoms of depression: Study

The study found that all types of dietary improvement appeared to have equal effects on mental health, with weight loss, fat reduction or nutrient-improving diets all can reduce the symptoms of depression. Dietary improvement significantly reduces symptoms of depression  |  Photo Credit: Getty Images Washington D.C.: While many might agree that ice-cream binge can soothe your soul during a rough phase in your life, a recent study suggests that weight loss, nutrient-boosting and fat reduction diets can reduce the symptoms of depression. In a new study published in Psychosomatic Medicine, a…

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Cannabis extract can be used to treat psychosis, says this study

A single dose of the non-intoxicating compound of cannabis — cannabidiol — can help reduce brain function abnormalities seen in people with psychosis, results of a clinical trial, led by an Indian-origin doctor, has revealed. Psychosis is a mental disorder characterised by a disconnection from reality. Brain activity in the people at risk of psychosis remains abnormal compared to the healthy ones. But in people who had cannabidiol, the abnormal brain activity was less severe than for those who received a placebo, suggesting cannabidiol can help re-adjust brain activity to…

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Single pill with two drugs can boost treatment for blood pressure, says study

A single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment as most of the patients are often reluctant to take more than a pill, according to a research. The research, published in the European Heart Journal, recognised that a major reason for poor rates of blood pressure control is that patients do not adhere to medications. Non-adherence increases with the number of pills, so administering the two drugs (or three, if needed) in a single tablet could transform blood pressure control rates, the researchers said. “The vast majority of…

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Breastfeeding might cut off stroke risk: Study

A new research has found that breastfeeding can reduce stroke risk in post-menopausal women. The study, which was published in the Journal of the American Heart Association showed 23 per cent lower risk of stroke among breastfeeding women. “Some studies have reported that breastfeeding may reduce the rates of breast cancer, ovarian cancer and risk of developing Type-2 diabetes in mothers,” said lead author Lisette T. Jacobson, Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita. Recent findings point to the benefits of breastfeeding on heart disease and other…

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Kidneys can be affected because of poor air quality, says study

Polluted air increases the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) which occurs when a person’s kidneys are damaged, or cannot filter blood properly, researchers, including one of Indian origin, have found. The study highlighted that people with diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure or heart disease are at an increased risk of developing CKD. Apart from PM2.5, air pollution also contains heavy metals such as lead, mercury and cadmium -all of which are known to negatively affect the kidneys. Researchers from the University of Michigan in the US, warn high risk…

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Maternal depression may affect child’s mental health, says study

Women, take note. If you are suffering from depression, it may affect your child’s stress and physical well-being throughout life, a new study has found. The findings, published in the Journal of Diabetes, suggested that depressed mothers had higher cortisol (CT) and secretory immunoglobulin (s-IgA) — markers of stress and the immune system — levels and displayed more negative parenting, characterised by negative effect, intrusion, and criticism. “Following mothers and children across the first decade of life, we found that exposure to maternal depression impairs functioning of the child’s immune system…

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Women More Likely To Die Of Heart Attack If Treating Doctor Is Male: Study

Women suffering heart attacks in hospital emergency rooms in the United States are more likely to die if their doctor is a man than a woman, warned a study Monday. The study was based on more than 500,000 patients admitted to hospital emergency departments for acute myocardial infarction — a medical term for heart attack — in Florida between 1991 and 2010. Researchers at Harvard University found a “stark” difference in survival according to whether the patient’s and doctor’s gender matched. Health coach Luke Coutinho talks about how many young…

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Do You Schedule Your Free Time? Don’t! Study Suggests It Could Make You Unhappy

Your social calendar might be sucking the joy out of activities that are supposed to be fun or relaxing, according to an upcoming paper co-written by a professor who studies time management. The paper argues that when a leisure activity is planned rather than spontaneous, we enjoy it less. That’s because we tend to mentally lump all our scheduled activities in the same bucket – whether it’s a dentist appointment or grabbing coffee with a friend. And that makes the pleasurable activities more of a chore. “It becomes a part…

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People Who Wear Glasses Are Indeed More Intelligent, Genetic Study Reveals

Findings of a new genetic research suggest that people who wear glasses are indeed more intelligent. Researchers said this has something to do with the genes. Wearing Glasses And Intelligence In the new study, which was published in the journal Nature Communications, Gail Davies, from the Center for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh, and colleagues involved 300,486 individuals who are between 16 and 102 years old. The participants had taken different thinking tests that were then summarized as general cognitive ability score. They also had genetic testing, which…

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