Parents, keep in mind: Less than 20% urban kids in India eat fruits once a day

Parents, keep in mind: Less than 20% urban kids in India eat fruits once a day

Only 18% of urban children in grade six to 10 in India eat fruits every day, show the results of a survey, revealing poor eating habits of a vast majority of kids in the country. At 14%, the proportion of children eating protein once a day is even lower, showed the survey by Podar Education Group which runs over 100 schools spread across the country. The survey involved responses from 1,350 parents of children studying in grade six to 10 in India’s metro cities. The results showed that only 35%…

Read More

Eat Less Live Long: Cutting Down On Your Calories May Slow Ageing

Eat Less Live Long: Cutting Down On Your Calories May Slow Ageing

Who doesn’t want to know the secret to long life? What we wouldn’t do to prevent those wrinkles and fine lines, which make the process of ageing so obvious. Ageing is inevitable, and it does dampen one’s spirit. While there are endless cosmetics products available in the market, each claiming to be a miracle formula to help you prevent signs of ageing or give you an youthful glow, the truth is that they can help only on the surface. If you want to slow down ageing naturally, you need to…

Read More

How to Slow Down Ageing: Eat Less and Live Long!

How to Slow Down Ageing: Eat Less and Live Long!

No one wants to grow old and experience wrinkles, pale skin, grey hair and weak bones. Although ageing is a part of our natural metabolism, there is a multi-billion-dollar industry devoted to all sorts of products that claim to fight signs of aging. The truth is that these products only go skin deep while ageing occurs deeper, at a cellular level. A recent study has suggested that eating less can slow down ageing processes. Published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, the study offers one glimpse into how cutting calories impacts…

Read More

Less sugar, more wellness

Less sugar, more wellness

Falling prey to diabetes not only means being compelled to end your love affair with some of your favourite grubs; the effects are, in fact, graver! Being diabetic also means being vulnerable to a host of other ailments that could be fatal in the long run. Fret not, because the good news is, with lifestyle management being instrumental in keeping blood glucose levels in check, staying healthy could be your discretion now. Eat at Ease Right choice of food, food composition per serving and serving size are factors that constitute…

Read More

Less Salty Diets Would Save Millions of Lives: Study

Less Salty Diets Would Save Millions of Lives: Study

Reducing salt intake worldwide by only ten percent could save millions of lives, a study reported Wednesday. Government-led public service campaigns could massively cut mortality and disability caused by salt-triggered heart attacks and strokes for just over 10 US cents a year per person, researchers calculated. Even without including healthcare savings, “we found that a government supported, national policy to reduce population sodium intake by 10 percent over 10 years would be cost effective,” the authors concluded in the medical journal BMJ. Most adults exceed the recommended maximum salt levels…

Read More

Cancer Cases Up by 50% in Less Developed Countries: Study

Cancer Cases Up by 50% in Less Developed Countries: Study

While there has been a 33 per cent increase in the global cases of cancers between 2005 and 2015, the countries with the lowest development status saw a 50 per cent rise during the same period, a study by the Global Burden of Disease collaboration has found. In contrast, countries with a high development status had 44 per cent of new cancer cases. The findings showed that in 2015, there were 17.5 million new cancer cases worldwide and 8.7 million deaths. Although cancer is the world’s second leading cause of…

Read More

Eat Less Salt for a Healthier Heart, Says New Study

Eat Less Salt for a Healthier Heart, Says New Study

A new research, published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, shows that reducing sodium intake may provide significant improvements in kidney and heart health among patients suffering from chronic kidney disease. The study showed that in patients with chronic kidney disease, restricting sodium intake reduced albuminuria which is an indicator of kidney dysfunction and blood pressure levels. Researchers also found that  paricalcitol, a vitamin D receptor activator, did not have any significant effect on these measures. However, the combination of paricalcitol and a low sodium diet resulted in the lowest albuminuria…

Read More

Dinner With TV May be a Recipe for Less Healthy Meals

Dinner With TV May be a Recipe for Less Healthy Meals

Families that eat dinner with the TV on tend to eat less healthy food and to enjoy the meals less than families who leave the TV off, according to a recent U.S. study. This was true even for families that were not paying attention to the TV and only had it on as background noise, the researchers write in the journal Appetite. “Family meals are protective for many aspects of child health,” lead author Amanda Trofholz said by email, adding that parents can take this time to check in with…

Read More

Screen Time, Phone use Linked to Less Sleep for Teens

Screen Time, Phone use Linked to Less Sleep for Teens

Digital distractions, and a more classical one, talking on the phone, are linked to shorter sleeping time and greater daytime sleepiness for teens, Canadian researchers say. “Today’s adolescents sleep much less than previous generations, their sleep quality is poorer, and they report more daytime sleepiness, all of which have health and social consequences,” said Jennifer O’Loughlin, an author of the paper in the journal Sleep Health and researcher at the University of Montreal. At the same time, electronic media are becoming a larger part of teen’s lives and are often…

Read More

Teens less likely to purchase beverages with health warning labels

Teens less likely to purchase beverages with health warning labels

Soft drinks and other sugary drinks that include health warning labels are less likely to be purchased by teenagers, a study has found. In the study, researchers used an online survey to gauge the beverage selections of more than 2,000 participants aged 12-18 and from diverse backgrounds. The beverages included either no label at all, or one of five warning labels — one featuring calorie content, and four displaying a variation of warning text. “The average teen consumes at least one sugar-sweetened beverage every day, which could account for more…

Read More