New Guidelines: Introduce Peanuts to Infants Early to Prevent Allergies

Parents may be able to reduce the chance that their children will develop peanut allergies by introducing the food early on, as young as four to six months of age, experts now say. The timing and method should depend on the infant’s risk of a peanut allergy, according to doctors who presented a preview of updated guidelines today in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “Guidance regarding when to introduce peanut into the diet of an infant is changing, based on…

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Peanut Butter Redux: More on Food Allergies

This week, we revisit the enthusiastically debated Oct. 2 column about food allergies in the workplace. To recap: After a peanut-allergic letter writer (LW) asked a colleague to stop bringing peanut butter sandwiches to work, someone deliberately smeared peanut butter on the LW’s desk, causing an allergic reaction. The boss dismissed the LW’s complaint and said the LW shouldn’t be able to dictate what co-workers eat. Many commenters argued that employees with severe food allergies are exclusively responsible for protecting themselves at work. The Americans With Disabilities Act, however, says…

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Vitamin D-Deficient Kids Likely to Develop Asthma, Allergies

Australian researchers have found that children with vitamin D deficiency were more likely to develop asthma and other allergies later in life. Researchers from Western Australia’s Telethon Kids Institute tracked vitamin D levels from birth to age 10 in Perth and found that children were at high risk of developing asthma and allergies as they grew older if they lacked the nutrient at a young age, Xinhua news agency reported. The findings also showed that repeated bouts of vitamin D deficiency in early childhood were linked to higher rates of…

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Eating Fish May Ward Off Allergies In Kids

Women who consume oily fish while pregnant or during breast-feeding may decrease the risk of their children developing food allergies, asthma, eczemas or hay fever, researchers have found. The findings have showed that children introduced to fish and eggs — major source of omega 3 fatty acids — before 11 months of age had a lower risk of developing allergies. “Fish intake in the family seems to reduce the risk of allergies,” said Karin Jonsson from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, in a statement. Kids who eat fish, eggs…

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New Immunotherapy Technique May Cure Food Allergies

Canadian researchers have developed a new immunotherapy technique that has the potential to eliminate the allergic response to peanut and egg white proteins. Anaphylaxis, defined as a severe rapid-onset allergic reaction, can be life-threatening and treatment options are limited. Using the new technique, the researchers were able to nearly eliminate the allergic reaction in mice by converting allergen-sensitive immune cells into cells that mimic the response seen in healthy, non-allergic individuals. The treatment reduced the symptoms of anaphylaxis, and lowered other key protein markers in the allergic response by up…

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Giving Babies Eggs and Nuts Early May Avert Allergies

Infants who get a taste of eggs and peanuts starting when they’re as young as 4 months old may have a lower risk of developing allergies to those foods than babies who try them later, a research review suggests. With eggs, giving babies that first spoonful between 4 and 6 months was associated with 46 percent lower odds of egg allergies than waiting to introduce this food later. For peanuts, offering infants a sample between 4 and 11 months was associated with 71 percent lower odds of peanut allergies than…

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Food Allergies Linked to Higher Asthma Risk in Kids

The higher the number of food allergies a child might have, the greater is his or her risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis during childhood, new research has found. “Of the major food allergens, allergy to peanut, milk and egg significantly predisposed children to asthma and allergic rhinitis,” said lead researcher David Hill from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) in the US. The study is a retrospective analysis of the electronic health records of more than one million urban and suburban children in the CHOP Care Network from…

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Thumb-Sucking, Nail-Biting Can Actually Keep Allergies at Bay

PhotoCredit:istock Is your toddler addicted to “bad habits” such as thumb-sucking or nail-biting? Worry not, as according to a study, she or he is less likely to develop allergic sensitivities in the long run. The findings showed that children with both thumb-sucking or nail-biting habits were less likely to be allergic to things such as house dust mites, grass, cats, dogs, horses or airborne fungi. “Our findings are consistent with the hygiene theory that early exposure to dirt or germs reduces the risk of developing allergies,” said Malcolm Sears, professor…

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Thumb-sucking and nail-biting kids have less allergies

NEW DELHI: Children who suck thumbs or keep biting their nails get scolded a lot for these bad habits. But new research has found that there is a positive side to these habits. Such children are less likely to develop common allergies to house dust mites, grass, cats, dogs, horses or airborne fungi. Children who have both habits are even less likely to have these allergies. The research, published in the journal of Pediatrics today, was completed by researchers of New Zealand’s Dunedin School of Medicine, assisted by professor Malcolm…

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Diet A, excessive-fibre weight loss program keeps meals allergies at bay

Eating high-fibre diet inclusive of a bowl of bran and some dried apricots in the morning and intake of Diet A can assist reduce meals hypersensitive reactions, finds a brand new examine. The findings confirmed that mice allergic to peanuts have been blanketed against the allergic reaction whilst fed on a excessive-fibre food plan. food products wealthy in fibre reshapes the gut and colon microbiota and facilitates to combat against food allergies, said the look at, led by using Jian Tan, professor on the Monash College in Australia. The immune…

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