40% women lung cancer patients in Goa non-smokers, likely victims of passive smoking

40% women lung cancer patients in Goa non-smokers, likely victims of passive smoking

Almost 40% of women in Goa who have lung cancer do not smoke themselves, which means it is likely that they are victims of `passive smoking’, an anti-tobacco NGO has said. The National Organisation for Tobacco Eradication (NOTE) said yesterday that there has been a rise in the number of women in the state who smoke. The overall percentage of smokers in the state’s population has dwindled in the last three decades, it said. NOTE India president Dr Shekhar Salkar told reporters that almost 40% of the women diagnosed with…

Read More

Novel treatment for cancer: Immunotherapy trials show promise in curing the disease

Novel treatment for cancer: Immunotherapy trials show promise in curing the disease

In the winter of 2013, Sue Scott, then 36, had already planned her own funeral. Her cervical cancer was spreading fast. Multiple rounds of chemotherapy, radiation and surgery had all failed. Tumours were invading her liver and colon, and squeezing her ureters. Her last chance was to enroll in an experimental trial in which doctors were trying to partially replace patients’ immune systems with T-cells that would specifically attack cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted infection. Within a few months, her tumours completely disappeared. This…

Read More

Beware, these are the types of cancer where patients are at higher risk of committing suicide

Beware, these are the types of cancer where patients are at higher risk of committing suicide

Patients with prostate, bladder or kidney cancers are five times more likely to commit suicide, a survey led by an Indian-origin scientist has found. The analysis also showed that cancer patients are about three times more likely to commit suicide than the general population. The proportion of attempted suicides which result in a completed or successful suicide was higher in cancer patients, with a higher proportion still in patients with urological cancers. Severe psychological stress is one of the main side-effects of both a diagnosis of cancer and the treatment,…

Read More

Hope for cancer patients: Enzyme linked to colon cancer identified

Hope for cancer patients: Enzyme linked to colon cancer identified

Researchers have identified an enzyme that appears to drive the conversion of normal colon tissue into cancer by attaching sugar molecules, or glycans, to certain proteins in the cell. The research, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, showed that the enzyme was absent in healthy colon tissue but abundant in colon cancer cells. “Our data suggest (that) this specific enzyme seems to affect a subset of proteins that could be involved in cell-cell adhesion,” said Hans Wandall from University of Copenhagen in Denmark. In other words, the glycan modifications…

Read More

Ladies, do you have normal BMI and higher body fat levels? You are at risk of breast cancer

Ladies, do you have normal BMI and higher body fat levels? You are at risk of breast cancer

Postmenopausal women with normal body mass index (BMI), but with higher body fat levels are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer, a study warns. Body fat levels are typically measured via BMI, which is a ratio of weight to height. While BMI may be a convenient method to estimate body fat, it is not an exact way to determine whole body fat levels, as muscle mass and bone density cannot be distinguished from fat mass. The study included participants who had a normal BMI (between 18.5 to 25.0) and…

Read More

Are you at risk? Absence of this gene can give men a deadly cancer

Are you at risk? Absence of this gene can give men a deadly cancer

A study has recently revealed that men who lack a certain gene subtype may be more susceptible to treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Researchers from Cleveland Clinic confirmed for the first time a mechanistic link between the gene HSD17B4 and deadly, aggressive prostate cancer. The team built upon their earlier seminal work in which they discovered that a gene called HSD3B1, when altered, enables prostate tumors to evade treatment and proliferate. They went on to show that the presence of this gene variant does in fact change treatment outcomes and overall survival…

Read More

A mouse study may hold answers to the link between drinking and cancer

A mouse study may hold answers to the link between drinking and cancer

Alcohol damages the DNA of stem cells responsible for producing new blood, according to a mouse study which may explain the link between drinking and cancer, scientists said on Wednesday. Health watchdogs have long warned that alcohol consumption contributes to seven types of cancer – of the mouth, throat, larynx or voice box, oesophagus or food pipe, breast, liver and bowel. What was not well understood was: how? For the new study, published in the science journal Nature, researchers gave lab mice diluted alcohol, known chemically as ethanol. They then…

Read More

This unusual use of blueberry extract in boosting cancer therapy will surprise you

This unusual use of blueberry extract in boosting cancer therapy will surprise you

Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix – the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Researchers from the University Of Missouri-Columbia, United States explained that one of the most common treatments for cervical cancer is radiation therapy and that it not only destroys the cancer cells, but also the nearby healthy cells, which proves to be a hazard. “For some cancers, such as late-stage cervical cancer, radiation is a good treatment option. However, collateral damage to healthy cells…

Read More

Ovarian cancer could originate in the fallopian tubes, not the ovaries

Ovarian cancer could originate in the fallopian tubes, not the ovaries

Most — and possibly all — ovarian cancers do not start in ovaries but instead in the fallopian tubes, which are attached to them, claims a recent study. The new findings also point to the possibility that removing a woman’s fallopian tubes, but not her ovaries, may reduce risk of ovarian cancer in those at high risk for disease, including those with genetic changes (mutations) known to increase risk (e.g. BRCA). Senior study author Douglas A. Levine from New York University’s school of medicine said that based on a better understanding…

Read More

There’s hope for cancer patients. A jet lag drug could ease chemotherapy-induced pain

There’s hope for cancer patients. A jet lag drug could ease chemotherapy-induced pain

A drug used to ease the effects of jet lag may also prevent the painful side effects of cancer medications, a study claims. Researchers from the University of Edinburgh and University of Aberdeen in the UK found that a drug known as melatonin appeared to prevent pain caused by chemotherapy damage to nerves by blocking the harmful effects on nerve health. They focused on a common condition known as chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CINP), which causes tingling and pain to touch and cold temperatures, that can be severe enough to cause…

Read More